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for two minutes. ms. castor: democrats and republicans agree that deficit reduction is important. in fact, over the past year and a half we have achieved over $2.7 trillion in debt reduction. now the republicans want to take us through a charade with this tea party budget. if enacted, the republican budget would weaken america's recovery. it would undermine what makes america great and what makes america strong. like education, the ability of students to attend college, medical research and inthe noah vation, the about of -- ability of our older neighbors to live their lives in dignity in their retirement years through medicare and long-term care. now we get a lot of advice and economists across the board, in fact, our own congressional budget office, advise that the best and fastest way to reduce the deficit to is to make sure people across america have jobs and are working. it is inexplicable that the republican budget proposes to eliminate jobs in construction, in education, scientific research, and instead heaps the burden on middle class families. experts predict the republican budge
and leave a nearly $6 trillion hole in the deficit that would lead to tax increases for middle-income families. that isn't balance. that is total imbalance. at the same time, republicans propose cutting $3.3 trillion from programs for people with low and moderate incomes, including hundreds of billions of dollars for food nutrition and medicaid programs. so i want to end by asking the republicans when they come and talk about their tax proposals to name a specific that they would address. it's not in the republican budget. name one, name two, name three. otherwise, it's worse than empty. the chair: the time of the gentleman has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: with that, mr. chairman, i yield three members to the gentleman from indiana, r. rokita. mr. rokita: i thank chairman ryan in bringing this budget to the floor. i rise in high support of it. i also am very proud, one of the highest honors i have had in my short time here to serve on this committee. not because of chairman ryan only, but because of the members. by members, i mean republican and democrat mem
to work, taking a shared responsibility approach to our long-term deficits so we bring them down in a balanced smart way and they rejected the idea that we're going to move the economy forward by giving windfall tax cuts to the very wealthiest in the country and the benefits of that would trickle down and lift everybody up. they rejected that lopsided approach that balance the budgets on the backs of everybody but the folks at the very top. balance the budget on the backs of our kids' education by slashing important investments. in that category of spending we make these important investments for our country and our future, they double the cut from the sequester. so those are our investments in our kids' education. those are our investments in science and research to help power our economy. those are our investments to help modernize our infrastructure. they cut transportation by 15% when we have 15% unemployment in the construction industry. so mr. chairman, the american people rejected the kind of uncompromising lopsided approach that we see once again presented here in the hou
nation that does not -- is not riddled with debt and deficit, but also a nation that continues to be the economic leader in the world. and i believe our plan makes -- protects those investments in those key components of growth. and i hope over the coming hours that we will go through this debate and -- and i know we'll have a spirited period of a lot of amendments. this -- this budget i believe will pass and it will have to then find agreement with our colleagues in the house. and i just want to again commend both the chair and, for that matter, the ranking member. at the end of the day, we have to find common agreement to get this done. this issue that hovers all over of our other debates has become a metaphor as to whether our institutions can if you please in the 2 1*9 century. so just as the chair and rank member found agreement through a markup process where both sides were heard and amendments were offered and debated in a fair and open process, i want to both thank the chair and rank member for their commitment. they have different idead about how we get there, but at t
and better jobs for the american people. after all the budgets that never balance and record deficits, job creation, we would be coming off the four best years in modmodern american history, because we had four $1 trillion deficits in a row. another that will, quote, only be $850 billion this year. that's yielded us less than 2% growth a year. we all know if we took the number of americans that have left the work force and recalculated unemployment rate, it wouldn't be 7.8%, it would be about 10.5%. the path that my friends on the other side recommend doesn't work. and the balance in both the r.s.c. budget and ryan budget are much more promising course. they achieve that balance by not raising taxes, while not raising taxes. i think that's very important, too. we certainly aren't undertaxed in this country. my friends on the other side clearly believe that we are. they are going to offer multiple tax increases in all their budgets. i like the budget that does not require tax increases. finally, both these budgets, the republican study committee budget and the republican budget, come to gri
a jobs deficit. we have a budget deficit. and these are the byproducts of a leadership deficit. we still have no budget from the president, in violation of the law. he gets his ncaa bracket in on time but still no budget. this is the fourth time in five years. he set a new record this year, two months with no plan, while we had trillion-dollar deficits and a debt crisis on the horizon. his party leaders, unfortunately, failing offering a serious account of our challenge. no serious plan to grow our economy or create jobs. no plan to ever balance the budget. take more. trillions of dollars more to spend more in washington. that's what got us in this mess in the first place. so what can be done? the good news is that we now have a vehicle for regular order. the democrats derailed the budget process each of the last few years and stopped governing when they stopped budgeting. at least we now have a budget process that's moving. we brought them back in the game this spring. that's a good thing. so what's going to happen in the weeks ahead? well, we will make the case for our priorities. whet
our first order of business will be to get our deficits and debt under control. >> then just this week, a different tone. he said we don't have an immediate crisis in terms of debt. in fact, the next ten years it's going to be a sustainable place." congressman van hollen, why the change? >> it's not a change. they're totally consistent. right now our big problem is to sustain the economic recovery. we've seen momentum in the job market. and the last thing we want to do right now is to put the brakes on that. in fact, one-half of this year's deficit is due to unemployment, the fact that more people aren't at work. so what the president saying our focus right now should be to get people back to work, sustain the recovery, and then reduce the deficit in a measured, balanced way. there's no doubt that we have to do it and the budgets the president will present and the ones we will present will do that. it will put us on a sustained downward trajectory on deficits. but our priority is job growth. >> this is the point, right? his argument is don't get us in the middle of austerity in the nex
through a state where wisconsin had faced a multibillion dollar budget deficit, we were having double-digit tax increases, and we saw some of the record job loss that we've seen in the past. so what did we do? we came in and took that deficit, $3.6 billion, and today it's nearly half a billion dollar surplus. we took up -- [applause] we took a state where taxes had gone up, and we not only lowered the overall tax burden for the first time in years, property taxes on a median value home had gone town in each of the last two years. [applause] and when it comes, and when it comes to jobs under my predecessor's term, wisconsin had lost 133,000 jobs, and back in 2010 a survey showed just 10% of our employers thought we were headed in the right direction. today we're gaining jobs and 93% of our employers say wisconsin is heading in the right direction. we can lead with an optimistic message. [applause] simply put, we showed in our election that when people realized the debate was between who do you want in charge, the big government special interests n this case the employee unions, or do y
reduce unemployment to nearly five -- two near 5% and three years. it would reduce the deficit by $4.4 trillion over 10 years. and it would strengthen medicare and medicaid amah and you'd be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. -- medicare and medicaid and you would be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. guest: the institute of policy analysis estimated that you are spending money on infrastructure. we have a to point to dollar trillion infrastructure deficit, according to the transportation -- american society of civil engineers. building roads, highways, bridges, etc. you put people to work building schools and other necessary things. you give money to the states. the states have laid off 700,000 cops, firefighters, and teachers. you give money to states for couple years to rehire them. those kinds of things add up. by doing all this, you stimulate the economy. that means the private sector generates more jobs. it comes to about 7 million altogether. host: what do you consider fair share when it comes to wealthy taxpayers? guest: we propose two different things. numb
, and the senate thinks shouldsome revenue should be idea to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not just simply cut tax rates for the rich. >> usually you can tax more and spend more and borrow more and that will somehow create growth and prosperity. i believe we have had four years of that experiment, which i fundamentally doubted and opposed from the beginning. and it hasn't worked. >> shepard: regardless of whether it's worked or hasn't, the insiders say the democratic budget will likely pass. mike emanuel is in washington. how has the vote been going and what's it like in there so far? reporter: we expect starting any moment they'll vote on a series of amendments between now and late night tonight. 25 to 40. summon hot-button issues including abortion, school choice, and bailouts. there are also arguments on budgetary matters. >> anyone wants to be taxed more than is necessary on either side of the aisle, but this enormous, enormous hubbub from the other side that says it's got a spending problem but refuses to look at the other side of the balance sheet, as a business guy,
policy center, the ryan budget would have managed to actually add $5.7 trillion to the deficit . a close look at the math makes it clear that the ryan budget can't recoup the revenue lost from its tax cuts without imposing large tax increases on the middle class families. the tax policy center was unwilling to speculate on where the lost revenue would come from. in addition to the economic policy institute estimates that e ryan budget would kill 750,000 jobs this year, two million next year and increased gross domestic product by 1.7 percentage points. the priorities of this budget are all wrong. it kills jobs, stifles growth and adds to the deficit. all while making life harder for seniors, women, children and the most vulnerable in our society. the math of the budget just does not add up. simple arithmetic tells you that the only way to pay for mr. ryan's proposed tax cuts for the fortunate few is to eliminate many of the deductions that middle class families count on to pay for housing and health care and to save for their retirement. the ryan tax plan would further burden those who a
about deficit reduction that it is a misplaced focus, that the real priority should be on job creation. but it seems that too many people in congress who just think the most important thing is to cut cut cut. so is the deficit really the most thant thing? is the deficit out of control, or is job korea payings more important? >> chris van hollen is right. we have over 40 million american families living in poverty. these numbers carry with them a really human toll. so if we want to be looking at the long-term success of the u.s. economy, then balancing the budget in the short term is a really short-term mistake. >> bill: in other words the best thing we could do to grow the economy is put people back to work. >> yes, and make the sorts of investments that will get people to work today, take a look at pre-k. you are not only employing a lot more full-time teachers but at the same time you are investing in future workers. >> bill: how can it be that you have got -- again, the dough -- these new record highs, corporate profits record high financial institutions are back
for the deficit in parents. >> but then what does it say to now that we have such a lack of funding that our class sizes are too big? >> hal: i think that's a republican principled stance what they consider a socialist education system and -- and sort of a youtube paranoid nut bar wing of the republican party that think high schools and middle schools are indoctrine nation camps for liberalism. those two camps have systematically over the years defunding public education, getting rid of it. it was a talking point during the debates. it was one of the things that i think rick perry didn't forget. get rid of the energy department, the department of education. now here is the thing -- the point i'm trying to make is that an education base you can legislate class size, how many books are available, food they get to eat, but you can't force par rental connection to the child. >> but would you agree we have a parental absence crisis? >> hal: no, i don't. i think there are critical groups, and usually they are either super rich or upper rich people who ignore their children a
you need to deal with it budgets and deficits and you need to keep growth going. here is what i saw over the weekend. recession in greece which is a actually a depression if you line it up against the u.s. great depression in 1929 it looks a lot a like in terms of how much unemployment there send a how much the economy was contracted. greece is having our great depression of the late 1920s. >> wow. >>> moving on to washington now. president obama's renewed push for a grand bargain may be showing some early signs of paying off, at least with one top republican. senator bob corker of tennessee says he could envision raising tax revenue if democrats embrace big changes to medicare and social security. he is at odds with other members of his party including house speaker john boehner who is ruling out the prospect of any new taxes. >> i think, by the way, there is a chance on a deal. i know the president is saying the right things and we have an opportunity over the next four to five months. i think republicans, if they saw true entitlement reform would be glad to look at tax reform tha
the deficit, more stimulus and spending. we are in the funny process where we will wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. any issue you have heard your callers call in and complain --ut, we might see today drone strikes against u.s. citizens, taxes, repealing healthcare -- they might all come up, but it is adding to a nonbinding budget resolution, so it is interesting and it might give people clues. host: a headline in your sayscation, "the hill," the senate is poised to pass a budget. guest: i think democrats will control the process and get it passed. .hey have a small window they can afford five democrats to not vote for it and still pass it, and in that case you would need vice president joe biden to break the time. -- the thai. .- tie there is pent-up frustration on the republican side about no real budget debate over four years. once it is passed, a lot of people will feel better. democrats will say we passed a budget, republicans get to complain about the budget month but from there it is hard to see how the senate budget reconciles with the house bu
different plans for dealing with the deficit. the senate version calls for spending $100 billion on infrastructure to help create jobs. the house version calls for deep cuts in domestic spending to balance the budget by 2023. >>> the california department of education is expanding its list of recommended reading for kindergarten through twelve grade and it includes newly published works dealing with sexual identity issues. here's abc7 news capital correspondent nannette miranda in sacramento with the story. >>> as summer nears, educators want to keep kids reading. the california department of education just updated its list of more than 7,800 recommended books. meant to prepare students for college and the ever-changing world. included for the first time are winners of the stone wall book award which recognizes lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender literature. >> it's good to teach kids that everyone is different and we are all people and we can all be accepted for who we are. i think it's great to see those books being recommended. >> the books are recommended according to age
vastly different plans for dealing with the deficit. the senate version calls for spending $100 billion on infrastructure to help create jobs. the house version calls for deep cuts in domestic spend to go balance the budget by 2023. >>> the california department of education is expanding its list of recommended reading for kindergarten through twelve grade and it includes newly published works dealing with sexual identity issues. here's abc7 news capital correspondent nannette miranda in sacramento with the story. >>> as summer nears, educators want to keep kids reading. the california department of education just updated its list of more than 7,800 recommended books. meant to prepare students for college and the ever-changing world. included for the first time are winners of the stonewall book award which recognizes lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender literature. >> it's good to teach kids that everyone is different and we are all people and we can all be accepted for who we are. i think it's great to see those books being recommended. >> the books are recommended according to age.
. hold on, mercedes, let's acknowledge what has happened, the deficits have dropped now for 3 straight years at a rate lower -- faster pace than we have seen since the end of world war ii. nobody wants to acknowledge that. but they are coming down because we did have to engage in emergency spenning when the chitanked and we are coming out of that. we have to have balance -- that's good. but what is really good is job creation and a strong economy. we are seeing the effects of austerity. they would trade our economy for theirs in a success. in realtime, as consequence of austerity. >> what do we do? 85% of americans want to see a balanced budget. we are not even anywhere near that with these plans? >> unfortunately, i think when you look at basic fact of the two budget proposals, we are so far apart and we need leadership from the president. we are able to find out what the president's march madness 56 are before we -- before he unveils his budget. again, i think that it really comes -- from president obama to take a lead, to keep meeting with republicans and enable to try to bring the
for the time. but i'm not seeing anything taming the grove of spending in the interim. so, deficits get worse, debt gets bigger problems get more inser mount able to me. >> right. soon we'll all look at detroit or greece or cyprus or mexico city. >> do you think that is where we are headed? >> pretty much, it happened during the great depression, it of created not by our economy but the government, we have the great recession right now, if we don't get out of the great recession it is a great depression. neil: all right on that happy note. how it was like, outside of that mrs. lincoln, how of the show. do you think that union unions are down and out? get ready, they are fighting back, and they have a lot of cash, wait until you hear where they are getting it. and wait until you find out what they have named in their corner. >> clash of the corporate tita titans. aig ceo robert whether he will lawyer up against the very folks to bailed his company out. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from nation
gone through a state where wisconsin had faced a multibillion $budget deficit. we saw some of the record jobs will we've seen in the past. what did we do? we took that $3.6 billion and -- half a billion surplus. we lowered the overall taxes for the first time in years. taxes on homes have gone down in each of the last two years. [applause] but when it comes to jobs under my predecessors terms wisconsin lost 300,000 jobs and just 10% of our employers were headed in the right direction. today we're gaining jobs and 93% of the employers says that wisconsin is heading in the right direction. we can leave with an optimistic message. simply put in we showed in our election who do you want in charge, the big government or do you want the hard working taxpayers, the hard working taxpayers win out and they will win out over and over again. in america, we need to show an optimistic message that we're not standing with the big businesses of america, we're standing with the hard-working taxpayers and this is the message that can resonate throughout this country. [applause] now, in addi
, and lawmakers with 30 seconds think they are run to overhaul the deficit. you have to have a process. now every package we get has been 11th-hour, crafted by the leadership behind closed doors. it concentrates the power in the hands of leadership and takes at away from the rank and file. the give-and-take gets you to a place where i did not get everything i wanted, but i get some of what i want it. everybody does not expect to get 100%. you do not expect that you are going to get 100% adopted. the same is true in congress. they have to reconcile those differences. the only way to do that is still a legitimate process. it has to be bipartisan. somebody is on to say, bipartisanship is not a theory, it is a political necessity. >> i am going to have to ask if we have time for one more question. we have time. you guys are lucky, at least one of you is. >> we will get to a microphone in one second. would you please come up ere. >> i'm a dentist in the san fernando valley dental society. one of the major concerns in this country is the affordable health care act, and there is a lot of concern about t
trillion deficits -- that would be the annual difference between what we bring in and what the government spends -- four in a row more than a trillion dollars -- after more than $1.6 trillion in tax increases, after hundreds of billions of dollars worth of new regulations, our country is mired, we are mired in the longest period of high unemployment since the great depression. that is a direct consequence of this huge debt and our creditors' lack of confidence that we're actually serious about dealing with it. indeed, many workers have simply given up on finding work, which is one reason why our labor force participation rate is now at a 32-year low. unemployment's almost 8% but that doesn't take into account the millions of people who have simply given up looking for work after a long period of unemployment. since june 2009, when the recession officially ended, median household income has fallen by more than $2,400. so instead of treading water, the average american family is seeing their buying power decrease by more than $ 2,400 since 2009. at the same time, they're finding not only ar
't even know we had a national debt or deficit. but then a grassroots movement known as the tea party started to emerge. [cheers and applause] and what made the tea party so effective was not only it came from the grassroots, but it had three core values; fiscal responsibility, constitutionally-limited government and free markets. and because of the tea party, we were able to put patriots like michele bachmann, joe walsh into congress so they can make sure that congress will not continue to spend my generation's money. [applause] we need to save the tea party so that we can save america. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, please welcome jenny martin from the tea party patriots. [cheers and applause] ♪ >> thank you. [cheers and applause] picture this: college students in this country who are optimistic about the future and look forward to living the american dream. after college they pursue their careers and begin to make a living. they become parents and put food on the table for their children, save for their retirement and still have money left for leisure activities and vacations.
for some tax revenue to help reduce the deficit, calls for some more stimulus, more spending that way. and we're in this funny process where today we will wrap up, i think a little beforehand technically, but we'll wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. basically, any issue you've ever heard your callers call in and complain about we might see votes on today. it could be stuff like drone strikes against u.s. citizens, and it could be taxes and repealing health care and all these different issues that may come up. the point to remember, though, is this is all adding on to a nonbinding budget resolution. so it's interesting, and it may give people clues as to what appetites there are in the senate to pass or repeal certain elements of policy. but it's not binding right away. >> host: headline in your publication, "the hill," says the senate is poised to pass a budget. do you expect this to pass, and what's the significance? where does it go from here? >> guest: we do expect it. i think the democrats will be able to control the process and get it passe
that it is the entitlement program -- social security and medicare, the primary drivers of our debt and deficit. this is a simple amendment. it says it establishes a budget point of order that any budget resolution that is brought forward that does not count or does not prepare a 75 year solvency for social security and medicare would be out of order. in the next 20 years we'll be paying out $5.1 trillion in benefits in excess of what we are bringing in in terms of dedicated revenue to the payroll tax. the unfunded liability of social security is $20.5 trillion. for medicare the unfunded liability is $42.8 trillion. these programs must be reformed so they are saved for future generations. again, i would hope everybody would support -- the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mr. johnson: -- any budget that does not have 57 year solvency. the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: social security and medicaid played a critical role in providing a foundation of financial security and health care for hundreds of millions of americans over the decades. democrats
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)